Diet, Exercise and Fitness, 8th Ed

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Diet, Exercise and Fitness, 8th Ed
$149.95

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Diet, Exercise and Fitness, 8th Ed
SKU: 502

By Ellen Coleman, MA, MPH, RD, CSSD

Revised in August 2011, this 8th edition of one of our most popular courses focuses on new International Olympic Committee recommendations for carbohydrate and protein intake and timing and explains the 2010 Dietary Guideline and new MyPlate food guidance system. New additions throughout the course include new research on caffeine as a performance enhancer; new cautions about antioxidant supplements and much more!

Course Length: 10.0 contact hours

Instructional Level: Intermediate/Advanced
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Diet, Exercise and Fitness, 8th Ed SKU: 502 By Ellen Coleman, MA, MPH, RD, CSSD Revised in August 2011, this 8th edition of one of our most popular courses focuses on new International Olympic Committee recommendations for carbohydrate and protein intake and timing and explains the 2010 Dietary Guideline and new MyPlate food guidance system. New additions throughout the course include new research on caffeine as a performance enhancer; new cautions about antioxidant supplements and much more! Course Length: 10.0 contact hours Instructional Level: Intermediate/Advanced Course Goals and Objectives: BEHAVIORAL OBJECTIVES Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to: . 1. Identify how intensity, duration, and fitness level influence the type of fuel used by the muscles for energy. 2. Identify the relationship of carbohydrate intake and endurance training to performance. 3. Identify the following diet components for an athlete: a pre-exercise meal, a training diet, a carbohydrate loading diet and intake during and after competition. 4. Identify the benefits of fat utilization during exercise and the pros and cons of a fat loading diet. 5. Identify the protein requirement for athletes and explain why it is different for athletes. 6. Identify three reasons why amino acid supplements are not necessary to increase performance. 7. Identify an appropriate fluid replacement to prevent dehydration and maximize performance. 8. Identify the problems associated with the common practice of “making weight.” 9. Identify the role of exercise in weight control, in regard to body composition, energy metabolism and eating disorders. 10. Identify which ergogenic aids are beneficial and which are worthless. 11. Identify some nutrition assessment techniques that constitute quackery. 12. Identify nutritional guidelines to ensure adequate nutritional intake for exercising pregnant women. 13. Identify a training diet that meets the calorie, carbohydrate, protein and fat requirements of an athlete, based on age, sex, weight, height, training goals and sport.
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Author Author Information
Practice Athletic Trainers, Massage Therapists, Occupational Therapists, Physical Therapy
Hours Approved 10